Westport Writers’ Rendezvous – October update

We had another great meeting at Barnes & Noble yesterday, with seventeen of us gathered to exchange ideas and recommendations. Alison McBain, Elizabeth Chatsworth, Ed Ahern and I bragged — just a bit — about our time travel anthology, When to Now, for which we did a reading and signing over the weekend at the Inaugural Saugatuck StoryFest in Westport.

aaa GHIf you like meeting authors face to face, plan to attend the latest Connecticut Authors Reading Series on Sunday, October 21, at 2pm at the Cyrenius H. Booth Library in Newtown. Among the featured authors are: Georgia Hunter, (We Were the Lucky Ones), Betsy Lerner, (The Bridge Ladies and The Forest for the Trees), Marilyn Simon Rothstein, (Husbands and Other Sharp Objects, and Lift and Separate), and Tom Seigel, (The Astronaut’s Son)

The Westport Writers’ Workshop has expanded its activities to include some popular Saturday workshops, for those who can’t attend during the week. On offer are A Writer’s Most Important Tool: The Power of ” What If “  with Jessica Speart this Saturday, October 20, Fall In Love With The Lyric Essay on Saturday, October 27, and Building a Multi-Dimensional Scene with Julie Sarkissian on Saturday, November 10. $75 each.

November 1NaNoWriMo begins! Click the link to find out more, and to find places where you can join your fellows to write your 50,000-word novel together.

nanoThe Fairfield Library will be offering a Writers’ conference on November 3, which will include Continue reading

Time traveling launch!

Oh the excitement! When to Now, the time travel anthology, is out tomorrow, October 1, and I have a story in it. But I’m not the only one, and the variety and quality of the other seventeen stories prompted me … Continue reading

Westport Writers’ Rendezvous – September update

Not sure why September always has that “let’s get back to work” feeling about it, but as if to encourage people to do just that, the events and opportunities for writers keep multiplying. We had eighteen people at Wednesday’s meeting, which provided lots to talk about. IN the interests of space – I’ll start with the upcoming events:

On Monday, September 24, from 6-7:30pm, the SoNo Branch Library will kick-off its Local Children’s’ author series with a book signing with member Kristen Ball, author of A Calf Named Brian Higgins. The event will honor the importance of access to fresh water globally with Millennium Promise.

I’ve just signed up for Wine and Write-in, a series of Tuesday evening writing opportunities at the Fairfield County Writers’ Studio, starting September 25. Led by the inimitable Stephanie Lehman, I’m hoping to work on my next project, a romantic comedy. I understand prompts will be available and all genres welcome. This is just one of many fall classes being offered.

8149356434_5d7396f061_bIf you need an inspiring place to write, but can’t get away on a writer’s retreat, how about three hours of writing in Mark Twain’s Library, for $75? You can do just that this Thursday, September 27, 2018 from 6-9 pm at the Mark Twain House & Museum in Hartford, CT. Space is limited to fourteen writers, and you can reserve your spot here.

And it seems the Mark Twain House is on a roll. They’re running their two-day Writers Weekend on September 29 -30. Events include writing workshops, panel discussions, author talks, book signings, and if you don’t have time to attend the whole weekend, one-day tickets are available. Click here for a full list of presenters and session topics. Keynote speakers include Gary Shteyngart and Jodi Picoult.

cover-medFlash fiction is all the crack, and it’s a gateway to getting published. The Masters Review is running a contest dedicated solely to flash twice a year.  The winning writer will be awarded $3000 and publication on The Masters Review site.  Deadline September 30.

And if you’re not sure how to write very short, Authors Publish Magazine is offering a free book to help you. The Quick-Start Guide to Flash Fiction. is a guide to writing and publishing flash fiction –– Stories 1,000 words or less. The book gives you 60 writing prompts, plus 60 publishers accepting submissions. Download it here:

The book you’ve all been waiting for, When to Now, launches October 1.You want it because it features stories by several members, including Alison McBain, who edited it, Ed Ahern, Elizabeth Chatsworth,  and yours truly. The pre-order page is live on Amazon for the eBook. And right now, it’s only $2.99 for the Kindle version, so you can afford to buy it!

The Westport Library’s creative non-fiction writing workshops begin on October 2 (introductory) and October 4 (advanced). They’re taught by Mary Lou Weisman, author of Playing House in Provence. Register here.

On October 4 at 6pm, former Poet Laureate Billy Collins will be reading from his work in West Hartford. Seating is first-come, first-served. Details here.

The Saugatuck StoryFest is the first annual literary festival organized in Westport, CT, this October 12-14. There’s something for everyone here. More than thirty writers of note have signed up to come, in many genres, including graphic novels and children’s literature, as well as memoir and all kinds of genre fiction. This is a great way to meet them face-to-face. There’s a list of authors and events on this website , and new info is added daily. Almost everything is free. And A Bradbury Evening, a celebration of Ray Bradbury with his biographer, Sam Weller and a live performance of one of his radio plays, is only $10. Don’t miss any of it!

SAVE THESE DATES

Plan to attend the latest Connecticut Authors Reading Series on Sunday, October 21, at 2pm at the Cyrenius H. Booth Library in Newtown. Among the featured authors are Georgia Hunter, Betsy Lerner, Marilyn Simon Rothstein, and Tom Seigel.

The Fairfield Library will be offering a Writers’ conference on November 3. Details to follow.

And on November 8, member Alex McNab will be interviewing author Eric Burns about his first novel after decades of non-fiction books. Details here.

Once you’ve published a short story or a poem, most literary journals aren’t interested in publishing it again. Still, the more a poem or short story is published, the more exposure it gets.and there are publications who accept reprints. Courtesy of Authors Publish.

See you next month. Keep writing!

Westport Writers’ Rendezvous – August update

I love the fact that members old and new show up each month to get or offer encouragement to other writers. It’s how I finally got my manuscript edited, so I can now look for a publisher. Thanks, everyone! As … Continue reading

Westport Writers’ Rendezvous – July update

We had a smaller group yesterday – the effect of summer, no doubt, but the conversation was animated and a number of people got answers to questions like “How do I go about getting a website?”

The answer to that one, by the way, was:

  1. Decide what domain name you want – one for you and one for the title of your book
  2. Get that name registered on any social media you can think of. You don’t need to use the social media site yet, but you want to be able to in the future.
  3. WordPress, Wix and Squarespace were recommended as sites that would let you design and manage your own website. There are sites on the web where you can compare the relative benefits of these, before you make a decision.The New York Times ran a recent article about making your own website, too.
  4. A recent blog post by Jane Friedman, writing guru, might help answer the question, too. So You’re an Author Without a Social Media Presence: Now What? (Thanks, Alex McNab for this and other suggestions further down the page.)

And talking about websites, one of our members, Elizabeth Chatsworth, has an audio sample of her writing on her site, even though the book isn’t finished yet. It’s a good idea and worth listening to. in the spring, I went to a class on how to record a podcast, which may now come in handy, since there’s a decent chance I may be able to publish one of my stories with an audio version available in the online version. You never know…

B&N storytelling 071917 editedBarnes & Noble in Westport, our gracious hosts for the Writers’ Rendezvous, have started a series of storytelling evenings, which, as it happens, are also on the third Wednesday of the month, and worth putting on your calendar. You’ll hear people telling their story without reading it, and it’s remarkably inspiring. Here I am, telling my story, and in spite of my accidentally pained expression, I’m having fun.

For blog readers or members who live in Norwalk, 3Birds Productions is having a community-building evening of stories next Tuesday, July 25 from 7-9pm at Harbor Harvest (7 Cove Avenue in Norwalk). The theme is Maiden Voyage, and you have 5 minutes to tell your story. Or you can come and just listen (from anywhere).

A couple of members asked for links to Autocrit, a software that does an edit on your writing and finds, in addition to typos, repetition, etc, a lot of your quirks, so you can change them if you want to. Duotrope, where all the best places to submit are listed, should be bookmarked by now!

I came across an article entitled Does Amazon KDP select help you sell more books? It’s not too long, so an easy read, and the general conclusion seems to be that Kindle Direct Publishing  works well for one 3-month enrollment per year, but perhaps not more.

Alex recommends an interview with Crime/mystery novelist Walter Mosley in The Paris Review  – Art of Fiction series, and a New York Times article about Junot Diaz writing a children’s book, headlined Child to Novelist: ‘Tell Me a Story’

Last month I mentioned CAPA, which I joined. Their local chapter has regular meetings in Shelton, and they’re also affiliated with APSS – the  Assn of Publishers for Special Sales, who offer special rates at events where you can sell your book.

A couple of free ideas: Penguin books is offering a free Guide to short story writing for download. And if you’re missing your critique group or want to start one but members live in various different places, Zoom Room offers free videoconferencing to help you out.

I’m going to see the movie Dunkirk this weekend, partly because my Polish father was one of the soldiers rescued from the beaches there. The Poles don’t often get a mention, but my dad, who was in France when war broke out, fought with the French and then the British. I happened to write about him on my personal blog a couple of weeks ago, if you’d like to read it. And if you want to read more posts like it, feel free to follow me!

Stay cool!

 

 

 

 

Westport Writers’ Rendezvous – January update

What a great first-of-the-year meeting we had on Wednesday. I think everyone left with ideas for new goals to set and how to get them done. More on that later, but first:

If you have a book you’d like to pitch to an agent, take advantage of the Fairfield County Writers’ Studio’s Pitch Party in Westport on January 28th from 10-12. $25 to pitch, $15 to sit, sip mimosas and see how it’s done… For tips on how to write a query letter, Alex McNab suggests Jane Friedman’s site, and also taking a look at Query Shark, for info on how not to write one.

FCWS is offering a broad selection of classes, in addition to this unique event. Hit the link to find out what they have.

A number of writing classes are also available at various venues in Fairfield County and New York. In the City, Gotham Writers is offering what they describe as a ‘rush of classes’ both in classrooms and online. I’ve tried them and found them very useful when I first began as a way of finding an instant critique group led by an experienced published writer.

laptop-writing-579

The Westport Writers Workshop has classes starting in Westport, Avon and Ridgefield. Subjects include memoir, fiction, the journey of writing for women, and personal essay.

Kate Mayer, one of our members, published a great blog post on achieving one’s writing goals. her simple method produced great results, so take a look.

The Connecticut Book Awards are back. These awards recognize the best titles of 2016 written by authors who reside in Connecticut. Book award submissions will be accepted starting January 2017 and will close in April 2017. For more information, please visit the Connecticut Center for the Book website.

The Connecticut Press Club is still accepting entries for their Annual Communications Contest. The only criterion for submission is that you must be a Connecticut writer and that the submission should have been published/broadcast/launched etc in 2016. The submitting process is still  more complicated than it should be, but if you’re interested, don’t give up. They’re accepting entries until February 6.  To ensure you’re on their mailing list, email CTPressclub@gmail.com.   The deadline is February 6.

One of our members, Sheryl Kayne, is producing a book for which she’s seeking contributions: Grandmas and Grandpas by Many Other Names.   This is an opportunity to celebrate grandparents. She’s looking for stories and/or photos about your own grandparents or yourself as a grandparent to accompany stories about fictional grandparents including Little Red Riding Hood’s as well as Heidi’s and Willy Wonka’s Grandfathers. She’s accepting contributions through Valentine’s Day and the E-book and softcover will be launched mid-April in time for Mother’s Day, Father’s Day and Grandparents’ Day. Contributors receive a free E-book.  Contribute here.

Bernice Roque, one of our members, is offering a useful (and free) task managing tool  specifically aimed at writers. If you feel you can’t keep track of things, this might be a good solution for you. Contact her through her website.

Elizabeth Chatsworth, another member, has been having some success with the grammar-checking tool Grammarly. It claims to find mistakes which Spellcheck doesn’t, and there’s a free version which should be worth trying out.

Among writing conferences coming up in our neck of the woods this year are these:

Unicorn Writing Conference Manhattanville College, Westchester March 25

ASJA (American Society of Journalists and Writers) NYC May 5-6

Writers’ Digest Conference, NYC August 18-20

BookBub is a great resource for authors looking to reach new readers for a debut or a series, to boost books up on the best-seller list, and even drive sales for backlisted books. Authors see an average earning increase of almost 200% when their book is chosen as a Featured Deal. GoSpark Press is offering a webinar; How to Maximize BookBub is set for February 2, 2017 at 4 p.m. PST (register here), and will help you figure out how to make Bookbub work for you, if you’re already published. Plus, it’s only $10…

Larry Brooks is a Californian writer with a great website called Storyfix. He coaches writers and now has a new virtual classroom which provides, to quote, “Hardcore Training Videos For Serious Authors”. He’s offering one free training module, one of five currently available. Here’s the link to “Essential Craft for Emerging Novelists,” an 81-minute hardcore craft training experience. Worth a look.

Book Riot, an online site that sends me updates on all sorts of book-related topics, has a post to inspire anyone who’s having trouble writing: a list of books that will help to get you started.

At our monthly meetings we set ourselves a goal to be accomplished by the next meeting, I’ve vowed to submit more work for publication this year, so I’ll be signing up with Duotrope. Now that I’ve said it in writing, I’ll just have to do it!